A scalpel and a bible

By Adapted by Susan Akyeampong from an article by AfriGO magazine | Angola in Southern Africa

Have you ever wondered what it means to be an outreach surgeon? Through their work, they not only heal bodies but also point to Jesus, the ultimate healer and source of eternal hope. His love and grace sustain them in this work. Dr. Sam Fabiono shares what his role as a surgeon involves and how surgeons like him are transforming lives and guiding others to Jesus in their time of need.


The patient lay on the operating table. I stood over him in my green scrubs, hands to my chest. I had performed this procedure countless times, surgeries are always unpredictable.


I looked at my patient, aware of the trust he placed in me. “If you don’t wake up from this anaesthesia, where will you end up?” I asked. It was not rhetorical—I wanted him to consider it. 


He did. Then I prayed for him before starting the operation. Thankfully, he lived and I believe he will live in the next life too. 


Being a surgeon means meeting people at their most challenging times. Sometimes, survival requires a miracle. I have a brief window to ask, “Is your life right? Do you want to set it straight?”


I didn’t always think I’d be a doctor. Torn between medicine and aviation, I loved science. After moving from Angola to study Biology and Chemistry in Namibia, I enrolled at Concordia University in California for pre-med. After graduating, I returned to Namibia and started an organisation for people affected by HIV/AIDS. A sickly child I saw there inspired me to help those in need.


Back in Angola, I worked in a mission hospital. One woman with advanced cancers was at peace after I prayed for her. Her daughter-in-law thanked me, saying it was the first time she had been calm in a long time.


As doctors, we offer hope and build relationships, showing we care about lives here and after. Fewer doctors choose this path due to the challenges and lower pay, but it is incredibly fulfilling. The impact on people’s lives is eternal.


In rural areas, patients often travel for days to seek medical help. Good care can transform families, visible in the joy in their eyes. Despite the challenges and the shortage of doctors, it’s incredibly rewarding work. 


Please pray:
•    For our new surgical team, that we find dedicated individuals with a heart for the nations.
•    For more trainers to support our surgeons, both short- and long-term.
•    For doctors serving in difficult areas and for their children.

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A scalpel and a bible

Have you ever wondered what it means to be an outreach surgeon? Through their work, they not only heal bodies but also point to Jesus, the ultimate healer and source of eternal hope. His love and grace sustain them in this work. Dr. Sam Fabiono shares what his role as a surgeon involves and how surgeons like him are transforming lives and guiding others to Jesus in their time of need.

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