Equalise : World AIDS Day, 2022

By Jacqui Croxon | International

Photo by Hope for Life Thailand

Over the last four decades, significant advancements in the understanding of HIV have allowed for notable gains in available treatments, quality of life and life expectancy, as well as prevention. But global inequalities not only persist, they have actually deepened during the Covid-19 years, exacerbating the situation and putting already vulnerable populations further at risk.

This World AIDS Day (1 December 2022), the theme ‘Equalise’ calls us to action to address the inequalities that are hindering progress towards ending AIDS.

UNAIDS Executive Director Winnie Byanyima says: “We can end AIDS – if we end the inequalities which perpetuate it. This World AIDS Day we need everyone to get involved in sharing the message that we will all benefit when we tackle inequalities…To keep everyone safe, to protect everyone’s health, we need to Equalise.”  

According to current figures, the number of people living with AIDS around the world has gone up by more than 10 million people over the last ten years. In 2021, around 1.5 million people became newly infected with HIV and more than half a million died from AIDS-related illnesses.

However, there are also huge inequalities revealed by the statistics. In sub-Saharan Africa, women and girls accounted for 63% of all new HIV infections in 2021, and six in seven of all new HIV infections among adolescents aged 15–19 years are recorded among girls. Girls and young women aged 15–24 years in the region are twice as likely to be living with HIV than young men.

Since the early 1990’s SIM and its partners have been committed to the issues of HIV and AIDS across the globe, responding through collaborative health, development, and education projects. Together, these ministries – spanning across 12 countries – join in the effort for equality through care, support and empowerment of those who are disadvantaged by their circumstances.

Under the banner ‘Hope for Life’, these initiatives express Christ’s heart for all people, and contribute to SIM’s purpose and mission to cross barriers – geographical, physical and social –  to reach the least reached.

Over the coming days, we’ll be highlighting some of SIM’s Hope for Life ministries around the world.

To find out more, go to www.hopeforlife.net.

 

Pray

• That SIM's Hope For Life projects would continue to break down barriers of inequality in the name of Jesus

• That God would continue to provide funding for these incredible projects aacross the world

• That the church would continue to serve those who live with HIV every day and reach out with the love of Christ

 

If you’d like to help Hope For Life follow the example of Christ to raise up ‘the least of these’, please visit https://www.hopeforlife.net/get-involved/ ​​​​​​​

SIM Asset Publisher Portlet

Asset Publisher

SIM Asset Publisher Portlet

Asset Publisher

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