Asha has the hope of dreams in south Asia
Asha grew up in an environment hostile to women in general, particularly to young girls, who were considered nothing more than a burden to the family. Until now.

South Asia

After a few feverish weeks of wondering, Asha finally received her acceptance letter into nursing college. She was ecstatic!

Everything had happened so fast. It had been only a few months that the idea of studying nursing had started to become a real possibility.

The dream had been born during the time Asha spent in the hospital caring for one of the other girls living at Beauty for Ashes - a recovery home for trafficked and sexually abused girls. The experience there made her realise she wanted to serve people in need and that she could become a nurse. This was nothing less than a miracle because of where Asha had come from.

Asha grew up in an environment hostile to women in general, particularly to young girls, who were considered nothing more than a burden to the family. She experienced much abuse from the time she was very young, and later she was prostituted by her own parents.

Asha grew up thinking she was not worth anything except to do what she was told to do by her parents - even if it meant selling her very soul. When she was in her teens, she could no longer bear the constant verbal, physical, and sexual abuse.

She wanted more than to be used as an object to make money for her parents. One day she ran away. Incredibly, she found police who heard her story, registered a case against her traffickers, and sent her to a children’s home for shelter. She testified with great courage in court about all that had been done to her, leading to the arrest of her abusers. 

Since then Asha has not looked back. She settled down to start her life again in the children’s home and later transferred to Beauty For Ashes when she turned 18. She received much healing and re-started the studies which she'd been forced to stop as a child

Despite being told by her family that she would never do well in school, she passed the classes which qualified her to apply for nursing training. Asha also discovered God and his love for her and started to believe that she is not an object to be used - but that her life is precious and significant.

She learned to work through issues that she struggled with, take responsibility for herself, serve people, and make good choices.  

It has not been an easy journey facing up to the rejection from her own family and the damage she experienced as a result of it. Asha questions why they treated her like an object, and why they abused and trafficked her. But she knows that even if there were answers, it would not ease the pain of all that happened to her.

But in all of this she has learned to return to God and not give up her dream for a different future.

Asha did not dream of becoming a nurse while growing up because she was not allowed to dream for her own life then. From all that she has experienced so far, she is motivated by a passion for justice and a desire to speak up against the wrong treatment of girls, the poor, and the powerless.  She now has a dream to pursue with all her heart.

Please pray

  • For Asha to learn afresh every day the purposes God has for her and the power he has given her to be a voice for good in the world around her.

  • For the staff of the Beauty for Ashes recovery home as they help girls who've experienced abuse, exploitation, and neglect find their voices and the God who values them.

Is God calling you to work with women like Asha or serve overseas? Contact SIM.

SIM Asset Publisher Portlet

Agrégateur de contenus

SIM Asset Publisher Portlet

Agrégateur de contenus

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