Bolivia

Almost 120 years after the first missionaries came to Bolivia to reach the unreached people groups of the Andes, the Bolivian church is increasingly engaging in missions. More and more Bolivians are responding to God's call to make disciples. At the same time there are several communities within this beautiful, diverse country where the good news of Jesus Christ is not known.

Therefore, as a team we work with the local church in mobilisation, disciple-making and reaching the least reached of Bolivia. Read our stories to know more about our work.

Bolivia

Almost 120 years after the first missionaries came to Bolivia to reach the unreached people groups of the Andes, the Bolivian church is increasingly engaging in missions. More and more Bolivians are responding to God's call to make disciples. At the same time there are several communities within this beautiful, diverse country where the good news of Jesus Christ is not known.

Therefore, as a team we work with the local church in mobilisation, disciple-making and reaching the least reached of Bolivia. Read our stories to know more about our work.

Come and Serve

Kayuparu

Kayuparu is an Aymara phrase that can be translated “at their feet,” or “at His feet.” As representatives of the One who took the form of a servant and stooped to wash feet, we take that incarnational love to “the least of these,” who sit at people’s feet all day long shining shoes on the streets of La Paz. We do this that we might serve them and bring them to the feet of Jesus as willing learners, humble servants and heartfelt worshippers.

Quechua Ministry

The 4 million Quechua spread throughout central Bolivia make up one of the largest least-reached groups in Latin America. There are still many remote Quechua communities in the mountains and jungles of Bolivia where Christ is not known.

Kayuparu

Kayuparu es una frase aimara que puede ser traducida “a sus pies (de ellos)”, o “a Sus pies (de Él)”. Como representantes del Único que tomó la forma de Siervo y se agachó para lavar pies, llevamos su amor encarnacional al “más pequeño de estos”, que se sientan a los pies de la gente todo el día lustrando zapatos en las calles de La Paz, para que podamos servirles y traerlos a los pies de Jesús como aprendices dispuestos, siervos humildes y adoradores sinceros.

Quechua Ministry

Los 4 millones de quechua-hablantes que se extienden por Bolivia central conforman uno de los mayores grupos menos alcanzados en América Latina. Aún hay muchas remotas comunidades quechuas en la sierra y selva de Bolivia donde Cristo no es conocido.

Communities where Christ is least known

Tacana and Tipnis areas

Many villages of the Tacana people and the Tipnis region have no gospel witness. SIM mission workers support local pastors so that their churches will reach other communities with the gospel.

Flying in small aircraft is often the only reliable way to reach villages that are frequently isolated by flood plains or unpredictable river travel. Traditional beliefs are another barrier to gospel outreach.

SIM Bolivia is looking for effective ways to address the groups’ spiritual and physical needs. An SIM family is pastoring Tacana pastors. Another SIM family will join a mission partner to provide air transport and medical support, reaching remote communities with the gospel.

Miners of Potosí

Ask a Potosi miner, “Who rules inside the mine?” and he will tell you, “El Tio.”

While miners may believe in God, they also believe that the pernicious Tio rules supreme underground, either allowing them to find minerals or keeping minerals hidden. He can protect or harm. They trust that devotion to the Tio, shown through sacrifices and offerings, will placate him, providing success and safety. Even so, miners die or are wounded in the dangerous conditions within the mines.

SIM is reaching out to miners and others in Potosi through a medical clinic, occupational therapy, English classes and community involvement, in order to begin to overcome barriers and resistance to the gospel. SIM missionaries also reach out to Potosi’s professional class, which lacks an appropriate witness.

Prayers

1

Pray for workers to join us in reaching those without Christ.

2

Pray for Perspectives, Equipping Servants International and theological training to prepare gospel workers to reach their own people and beyond.

3

Pray for churches to turn away from legalistic attitudes and embrace the gospel of grace.

4

Pray for God to use SIM’s medical ministry, English classes and other creative outreaches to bring people closer to Him.

5

Pray for partner ministries including COPROMEC that produces Sunday school material, Mosoj Chaski radio that reaches Quechuas and Camp Kewiña.

6

Pray for the government of Bolivia. Pray for peace, joy, and justice in this country.

7

Pray to the Lord to send more workers into this field.


Related stories

Distance alters the Andersons' family and ministry

Ministry and family life take a different shape for the Andersons amidst the COVID-19 crisis, especially since they are separated from their 11-year-old son.

The Quechua connection

A simple Quechua conversation in a hospital led to a couple committing their lives to Jesus. It also led to a resilient friendship at the perfect time.

Light at the end of the tunnel

I took a deep breath and reconsidered my options. The most appealing choice for me would require us to backtrack several miles to the place we took the shot cut and then climb over a high mountain pass.

Jonny speaks up for Jesus in Bolivia

Our founding fathers' goal was to share the gospel in places it had never been heard; now many missionaries want to help believers build a lifelong relationship with Jesus.

Where the sun doesn't shine

SIM Bolivia reaches out to the miners of Potosí and dreams of them going in the mines singing praises to the Lord.

The masked shiners of La Paz

SIM workers Randy and Dani Davis are establishing a church called Kayaparu ("at His feet") amongst one of Bolivia's least-reached communities — the shoe shiners of La Paz.

The surprising ways God is at work in Bolivia

SIM has a commitment to the least reached people, where there is no gospel. In Bolivia this includes indigenous groups, rural residents and urban dwellers.

Related stories

Distance alters the Andersons' family and ministry

Ministry and family life take a different shape for the Andersons amidst the COVID-19 crisis, especially since they are separated from their 11-year-old son.

The Quechua connection

A simple Quechua conversation in a hospital led to a couple committing their lives to Jesus. It also led to a resilient friendship at the perfect time.

Light at the end of the tunnel

I took a deep breath and reconsidered my options. The most appealing choice for me would require us to backtrack several miles to the place we took the shot cut and then climb over a high mountain pass.

Jonny speaks up for Jesus in Bolivia

Our founding fathers' goal was to share the gospel in places it had never been heard; now many missionaries want to help believers build a lifelong relationship with Jesus.

Where the sun doesn't shine

SIM Bolivia reaches out to the miners of Potosí and dreams of them going in the mines singing praises to the Lord.

The masked shiners of La Paz

SIM workers Randy and Dani Davis are establishing a church called Kayaparu ("at His feet") amongst one of Bolivia's least-reached communities — the shoe shiners of La Paz.

The surprising ways God is at work in Bolivia

SIM has a commitment to the least reached people, where there is no gospel. In Bolivia this includes indigenous groups, rural residents and urban dwellers.